Posted 5 hours ago

queerbot22:

if you slim down characters to make them ‘sexier’ in your fanart, we can’t be friends

Posted 6 hours ago

sapphicnymph:

leaving Laverne Cox off of the Time top 100 despite the overwhelming support she received is an act of violence and erasure towards trans women

Posted 8 hours ago

dorkfeyrac:

people that are dorks but also sexually attractive need to either stay away from me or get very very close to me

Posted 9 hours ago

kandycube:

How to fuck over some one with vertigo

(Source: urhajos)

Posted 9 hours ago

groovy-bastard:

Lucky Luke Tous à L’ouest


There is nothing to dislike about this movie.

Posted 9 hours ago

illustriousresearch:

Different breeds of rabbits. I like the floppy ears and the droopy look they give them. Angora rabbits are great for what I imagine a live dust bunny would look like.

(All these are images found during my research period before I ended up scrapping the project.)

Posted 9 hours ago

illustriousresearch:

Flemish giant rabbits are huge and absolutely lovely. They’re so oversized! Compare to the tiny hermelin (Netherland dwarf) rabbit with their small ears or the Belgian hare (bottom right).

For Buster the dust bunny, I prefer big and fluffy. Possibly with huge floppy ears. Broad, square head.

(All these are images found during my research period before I ended up scrapping the project.)

Posted 9 hours ago
Posted 14 hours ago
  1. Yesterday: *Gets back a paper with the highest mark I've gotten so far*
  2. Me: Yo!
  3. Today: *Gets back a paper with the lowest mark I've gotten so far*
  4. Me: Oh.
Posted 17 hours ago

handsometuesday:

Dr. Mary Walker ”believed that tight corsets along with voluminous skirts and petticoats were unsanitary and hampered her medical practice. So she didn’t wear them: first sporting bloomers, then, midway through the war, abandoning those for a male surgeon’s uniform. She didn’t attempt to pass as a man; she was an obviously female doctor wearing a male uniform…. She continued to wear men’s clothing throughout her long life (she lived until 1919) and continually advocated for rational dress reform for women.”